Regarding the article on this website "Prepaid Electricity in Indonesia: A guide to PLN’s prabayar system"

Hawk256

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This thread has me thinking about what supply we actually have. Residential power but unknown supply wattage. I can run two 1pk ACs, electric instant water heater, well pump, washing machine and electric oven all at the same time without tripping the breaker. Add a commercial sewing machine and then the breaker will trip. Since I can run all of these appliances at the same time, I never though much about it. Now I am curious.
 

Hawk256

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This thread has me thinking about what supply we actually have. Residential power but unknown supply wattage. I can run two 1pk ACs, electric instant water heater, well pump, washing machine and electric oven all at the same time without tripping the breaker. Add a commercial sewing machine and then the breaker will trip. Since I can run all of these appliances at the same time, I never though much about it. Now I am curious.
According to the bill, we only have 2200 watt supply. Seems like it should be impossible to run the appliances that we do. Odd.
 

a-sha

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According to the bill, we only have 2200 watt supply. Seems like it should be impossible to run the appliances that we do. Odd.
Seems odd to me too, looking at all your appliances, specially the instant water heater!
 

HappyMan

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It's a puzzle, yes. Maybe, some expert in this field could write an article.
Not an expert here, but even just not having massive holes above the doors in your rooms (a standard architectural feature here) would probably make a difference. Never seen a ventilated roof on a house. I've never lived in an Indonesian house that had seals on the doors or windows, either. Double glazing? 😂
 

a-sha

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Not an expert here, but even just not having massive holes above the doors in your rooms (a standard architectural feature here) would probably make a difference. Never seen a ventilated roof on a house. I've never lived in an Indonesian house that had seals on the doors or windows, either. Double glazing? 😂
Agree about the double glass, also for noise reduction. Don't know about the ventilated roof, is that good or not good for keeping one's home 'segar dan sejuk' (cool)?
 

HappyMan

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Agree about the double glass, also for noise reduction. Don't know about the ventilated roof, is that good or not good for keeping one's home 'segar dan sejuk' (cool)?
This paper written by some Indonesian students suggests a reduction of temperature by 1.2 degrees. https://knepublishing.com/index.php...ot be applied,more suitable for cold climates.

It does make sense that the roof would absorb solar heat and that you would not want that heat to then be trapped against the ceiling of a room you are trying to air condition. Don't think I've ever seen insulation between the ceiling and roof here.
 

centurion

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It will also help to have inverter ACs. Older ACs can only run the compressor at full power or off, so to hold a temperature they must cycle from 50w to 1000w every few minutes, if you have several ACs like this cycle on at the same time, you can easily overload the breaker.

Inverter ACs can run the compressor at lower wattage continually, so in order to hold a temperature it may be running 500w continuously, rather than cycling 50-1000-50-1000. Much fewer problems overloading the breaker and reduces it eliminates the need to go turn off one AC so you can turn on a different AC or water kettle.

Plus the inverter technology is just more efficient for a cheaper power bill. Insulation and properly sized ACs for their rooms will also help things run smoothly.
While I was living in South Jakarta, a heavily air-polluted area, as most of the city, the AC serviceman told me that the classical AC is better as it is more robust. Inverter AC is too sophisticated, the outdoor unit gets dirty fast with microdust, becomes less efficient, and lasts shorter and that was the reason why my inverter AC did not work well (it worked well after every dust washing of the outdoor unit, freon levels were good, but after some time the cooling was less and less).

When my inverter AC finally died, after becoming utterly inefficient and not cooling enough, I installed a classical one.
 

Brian86

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Inverter AC is too sophisticated, the outdoor unit gets dirty fast with microdust,

I can see the logic to that; since the compressor runs continuously the fan in the outdoor unit must run continuously also, whereas the older technology the compressor and outdoor fan cycle on and off many times throughout the day. More fan = more dirty air = more buildup.

Indeed there are pros and cons to both, specifically for the electrical supply limitation an Inverter unit is better.
 

a-sha

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This paper written by some Indonesian students suggests a reduction of temperature by 1.2 degrees. https://knepublishing.com/index.php/KnE-Social/article/view/4983/9977#:~:text=This study showed that the,homes that were not ventilated.&text=But this cannot be applied,more suitable for cold climates.

It does make sense that the roof would absorb solar heat and that you would not want that heat to then be trapped against the ceiling of a room you are trying to air condition. Don't think I've ever seen insulation between the ceiling and roof here.
Thanks for the link. As a matter of fact, the project developer of the homes in Tangerang, where I bought my house, is installing a ventilated rooftop. Checking the plans, I before was wondering about this kind of rooftop and about the effects.
 
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godmachine12

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Not an expert here, but even just not having massive holes above the doors in your rooms (a standard architectural feature here) would probably make a difference. Never seen a ventilated roof on a house. I've never lived in an Indonesian house that had seals on the doors or windows, either. Double glazing? 😂
The build quality on the whole is abysmal. The last place I was in, a new development in BSD, was the worst built house I've lived in by far. It's almost as if the builders had a checklist of all the things a well-built house should have and intentionally disregarded them.
 

a-sha

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The build quality on the whole is abysmal. The last place I was in, a new development in BSD, was the worst built house I've lived in by far. It's almost as if the builders had a checklist of all the things a well-built house should have and intentionally disregarded them.
I visited such new developments in BSD, back in 2017, looking for a house. Indeed, not my 'cup of tea' and very 'mahal'.
 

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