Garden visitors

Bad_azz

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The snake our dogs killed, not sure if I was sad or happy about that, because it was quite a dangerous snake.
Death's head moth
& The Green Tree Dragon..
Info re the mangled snake- banded krait- highly venomous.
 

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Bad_azz

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Another snake - red necked keelback, & a tarantula...
 

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Bad_azz

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We get quite a diverse selection of naughty snakes popping in...
Also spiders, lots of spiders, here's a nice harmless one - although huge.
& then a pic of yours truly after caterpillar hairs somehow blew onto the back of my neck... That was the most painful case of hives I have had.
 

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Bad_azz

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Atlas moths are a frequent visitor & I often mistake them for bats, until a second or two later I realise they are way too slow to be bats.
I love these visitors.
 

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harryopal

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That looks like a Big moth. The Bobong moth of the Australian alps was an important cultural element for Aboriginal people who would gather in the summer months as the moths appeared in prodigious numbers and were an important food source.
1061

And what of the snakes? How do you know which might be venemous?
That caterpillar hair reaction certainly looks very disagreeable. I am sure you must have tried a variety of methods to ease the discomfort. What worked best?
Our kitchen sink visitor popped his or her head up a couple of times but hasn't fully reemerged. There used to be a big goanna hang around the entrance at one of Queensland's national parks. I was having a sandwich with cheese in it so offered a piece to the goanna which liked it. I then put a piece of cheese on my finger to hand feed the animal and learned that goannas have very sharp, pin like teeth.
I have now put some pieces of cheese in the sink to try and coax our friend out. And as I was typing the lizard came out for some cheese but back down the hole the moment it saw me.
 

Bad_azz

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That looks like a Big moth. The Bobong moth of the Australian alps was an important cultural element for Aboriginal people who would gather in the summer months as the moths appeared in prodigious numbers and were an important food source.
View attachment 1061
And what of the snakes? How do you know which might be venemous?
That caterpillar hair reaction certainly looks very disagreeable. I am sure you must have tried a variety of methods to ease the discomfort. What worked best?
Our kitchen sink visitor popped his or her head up a couple of times but hasn't fully reemerged. There used to be a big goanna hang around the entrance at one of Queensland's national parks. I was having a sandwich with cheese in it so offered a piece to the goanna which liked it. I then put a piece of cheese on my finger to hand feed the animal and learned that goannas have very sharp, pin like teeth.
I have now put some pieces of cheese in the sink to try and coax our friend out. And as I was typing the lizard came out for some cheese but back down the hole the moment it saw me.
Snakes, I have seen- red necked keelback, banded krait & the calliphis blah blah blah one. I just look around the net & find pictures with info and see if they tally up.

Re insect bites and stings, I usually dab/coat with Freshcare oils or kayu putih oil, the mentholy stuff tends to make it sting a bit but takes the itch out. Which in turn stops me from scratching at it and therefore prevents it spreading or getting infected.
 

harryopal

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No success coaxing our mini Komodo dragon back out into the sink. This morning I thought, well if our friend came in via the drain pipe maybe it can exit the same way. I filled the sink and then pulled the plug hoping it would flush our dragon back to the exit. Looked down the sink drain and no sign. A few minutes later I heard a scratching and the dragon was out in the sink. A quick throw of a tea towel and we had our dragon. A short walk up the lane to some bush land and watched him or her scurry away.
Had initially thought of our small garden but we would have had to supply feed as it is a small walled area that would not provide enough food. And if we were away? So the bushland was best.
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Felicity

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Only biting or chewing it would be bad yes. Is he spraying yet?

Hopefully he doesn’t chew it bite it, I can’t watch him 24/7 :(
I think he haven’t been spraying. He was sterilised at age 8 months. Does he still spraying after sterilised?
 

jstar

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Could be. Normally they start at 6-7 months. So castration better takes place before that. Approx. 20% never stops, even when spayed.
 

nosox

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as previously suggested.... stampede

20191221_120026.jpg
 

waarmstrong

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Looks like everyone and everything is headed for higher ground. Some at a faster pace than others.
 

jstar

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Currently our garden visitors are the catfish who came from the river. Seen a couple of snakes too.
 

harryopal

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This character showed up at the front door the other day and asked my wife for a kiss so he could turn into a handsome prince. She declined.

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A new flower pot at the back door drew this visitor this morning Looks rather plain until it flutters. Sorry about the lack of sharpness in the following pic but it shows the colour.

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nosox

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this gal looks like a St Andrews Cross spider which, according to Wikipedia is only in Australia
spidy.jpg
 

Methblinkz

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Here are some pics of a few of the visitors we had over the years, apologies if I have done this before, I forget.

& please add your own too.
tarantula- 1 of several that popped in over the years











May I ask in what part of Indonesia you live? We live on Batam and I never seen any kind of big spider. Which is lucky, since I would immediately kill myself when I see a Tarantula somewhere.

Iam kinda surprised though, I always thought this kind of climate is perfect for insects of all sorts. Well again, Iam happx about that but even in Germany I saw bigger spiders then anywhere here. Or maybe cause it is cause not much jungle is left here where we live. Then again, even on Borneo (i visited seruyan years ago and more or less lived next to the jungle in an non air conditioned house) or on Java i didn't "find" any bigger species. Maybe I really was just lucky.

The only visitors in our garden are toads, frogs and these little jumping spiders that don't really bother me.
Ps: my daughter made the pics with all the emojis 😅 and of course we also have these smaller lizards, cicak, all over the place. Sometimes rats and cockroaches, but I guess this is pretty normal and what I experienced in most places. Oh..and bats, they also fly around here.
 

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Wisnu

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Jumping spider is a lovely cute pet. Very easy to care and enjoyable.
Nice macro photography inject, but you need macro lens.

2021-03-31_04-43-55.jpg
 

HappyMan

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Jumping spider is a lovely cute pet. Very easy to care and enjoyable.
Nice macro photography inject, but you need macro lens.

View attachment 1747

I've seen someone use a fixed lense combined with another old, detached, fixed lense to take macro shots, kinda like a manual microscope. I don't think the results were as good as this, though. I only mention it because it is cheap, if you already have the fixed lense that some people get with their SLRs, and someone was saying they don't have a macro lense.

It's so cool how soft and fuzzy the little monsters look when you can see them clearly.
 

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