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Garden visitors

Bad_azz

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The snake our dogs killed, not sure if I was sad or happy about that, because it was quite a dangerous snake.
Death's head moth
& The Green Tree Dragon..
Info re the mangled snake- banded krait- highly venomous.
 

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Bad_azz

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We get quite a diverse selection of naughty snakes popping in...
Also spiders, lots of spiders, here's a nice harmless one - although huge.
& then a pic of yours truly after caterpillar hairs somehow blew onto the back of my neck... That was the most painful case of hives I have had.
 

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Bad_azz

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Atlas moths are a frequent visitor & I often mistake them for bats, until a second or two later I realise they are way too slow to be bats.
I love these visitors.
 

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harryopal

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That looks like a Big moth. The Bobong moth of the Australian alps was an important cultural element for Aboriginal people who would gather in the summer months as the moths appeared in prodigious numbers and were an important food source.
1061

And what of the snakes? How do you know which might be venemous?
That caterpillar hair reaction certainly looks very disagreeable. I am sure you must have tried a variety of methods to ease the discomfort. What worked best?
Our kitchen sink visitor popped his or her head up a couple of times but hasn't fully reemerged. There used to be a big goanna hang around the entrance at one of Queensland's national parks. I was having a sandwich with cheese in it so offered a piece to the goanna which liked it. I then put a piece of cheese on my finger to hand feed the animal and learned that goannas have very sharp, pin like teeth.
I have now put some pieces of cheese in the sink to try and coax our friend out. And as I was typing the lizard came out for some cheese but back down the hole the moment it saw me.
 

Bad_azz

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That looks like a Big moth. The Bobong moth of the Australian alps was an important cultural element for Aboriginal people who would gather in the summer months as the moths appeared in prodigious numbers and were an important food source.
View attachment 1061
And what of the snakes? How do you know which might be venemous?
That caterpillar hair reaction certainly looks very disagreeable. I am sure you must have tried a variety of methods to ease the discomfort. What worked best?
Our kitchen sink visitor popped his or her head up a couple of times but hasn't fully reemerged. There used to be a big goanna hang around the entrance at one of Queensland's national parks. I was having a sandwich with cheese in it so offered a piece to the goanna which liked it. I then put a piece of cheese on my finger to hand feed the animal and learned that goannas have very sharp, pin like teeth.
I have now put some pieces of cheese in the sink to try and coax our friend out. And as I was typing the lizard came out for some cheese but back down the hole the moment it saw me.
Snakes, I have seen- red necked keelback, banded krait & the calliphis blah blah blah one. I just look around the net & find pictures with info and see if they tally up.

Re insect bites and stings, I usually dab/coat with Freshcare oils or kayu putih oil, the mentholy stuff tends to make it sting a bit but takes the itch out. Which in turn stops me from scratching at it and therefore prevents it spreading or getting infected.
 

harryopal

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No success coaxing our mini Komodo dragon back out into the sink. This morning I thought, well if our friend came in via the drain pipe maybe it can exit the same way. I filled the sink and then pulled the plug hoping it would flush our dragon back to the exit. Looked down the sink drain and no sign. A few minutes later I heard a scratching and the dragon was out in the sink. A quick throw of a tea towel and we had our dragon. A short walk up the lane to some bush land and watched him or her scurry away.
Had initially thought of our small garden but we would have had to supply feed as it is a small walled area that would not provide enough food. And if we were away? So the bushland was best.
P1050420.JPG
P1050419.JPG
 

Felicity

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Only biting or chewing it would be bad yes. Is he spraying yet?
Hopefully he doesn’t chew it bite it, I can’t watch him 24/7 :(
I think he haven’t been spraying. He was sterilised at age 8 months. Does he still spraying after sterilised?
 

jstar

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Could be. Normally they start at 6-7 months. So castration better takes place before that. Approx. 20% never stops, even when spayed.
 

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