Documents required for muslim mixed marriage in Indonesia

Vanuatu

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Islam certificate is just a record you've made the 'Shahada' statement. Belief in God and Muhammed as his prophet.
I obtained mine from New Zealand.
But i have heard of people doing them on the spot at the religious marriage office in Indonesia.


I did mine at the KUA office in Kemang, but the head of the office charged me 5 million for the certificate as he said he was sure I was faking it for the marriage coupled with the fact that I didn't want to do the shahada in a mosque but instead in his office.
 

Jaime C

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I did mine at the KUA office in Kemang, but the head of the office charged me 5 million for the certificate as he said he was sure I was faking it for the marriage coupled with the fact that I didn't want to do the shahada in a mosque but instead in his office.
That’s pretty amazing.
 

El_Goretto

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I spent the day at the mosque, I got an hour or so of lessons with the imam. Then I did the shahada in the mosque along with a couple prayers. My father in law, who's not the most devout of Muslims, accompanied me all the way, showing me the ropes so that I don't embarrass myself too much.

At the end of the day, it was rather pleasant, everyone was nice and respectful to me, I got to learn a few things too about Islam and didn't have to pay any fee.
 

wanderer

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A statement has never been married (single) at the top of the seal / stamp duty worth Rp.6000, – (six thousand dollars) from Head of District (Ketua RT-RW).

A bit expensive to get married in Indonesia, these days!! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

Aidan1988

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I spent the day at the mosque, I got an hour or so of lessons with the imam. Then I did the shahada in the mosque along with a couple prayers. My father in law, who's not the most devout of Muslims, accompanied me all the way, showing me the ropes so that I don't embarrass myself too much.

At the end of the day, it was rather pleasant, everyone was nice and respectful to me, I got to learn a few things too about Islam and didn't have to pay any fee.
I imagine some people want to avoid a masjid conversion because of the insistence on being circumcised.
Some masjids there ask for a medical cert proving it.
Indonesia is under the Shafi'i madhhab which considers it compulsory.
There are two Sunni madhhab that only consider it highly recommended but not compulsory, particularly for converts.
The masjid i converted to in NZ never asked about it and I've never had any Muslim in NZ ever bring up the subject with me in the last 2 years since it converted.
 

El_Goretto

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I imagine some people want to avoid a masjid conversion because of the insistence on being circumcised.

I know I'm more the exception than the norm but I've never been pressured into circumcision. ?
 

jstar

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For those interested; a hospital close to my place offers the Lebaran back to school special again...

IMG_7977.JPG


IMG_7976.JPG
 

Vanuatu

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That’s pretty amazing.

Me, being a wise ass, paid him in 50K notes counted out at his desk in front of the witnesses to the certificate signing. I also commented that it must be difficult for poor people to convert. He took his revenge later that day. He was also set to officiate the wedding ceremony later that week and called my wife to say that we had to pay another 2 million or he wouldn't show up. I'm assuming he had to split some of the original 5 million with his staff after they saw me pay him and wanted to make up for it.
 

Puspawarna

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I think she just wants the buku nikah and everything done normally.

Which leaves me at getting these documents sorted.

Harrumph. So basically she is saying, "no no, we can't get married in YOUR country, where it would be easy/cheaper, we have to get married in MY country. Now, YOU make it happen!"

Seems to me that if she wants to get married a certain way, she can assume a large share of the responsibility for sorting the bureaucracy (probably easier for her anyway, as a native Indonesian speaker).

- - -
On a more pleasant note, it's great of you to keep the forum updated on how everything goes. Much appreciated!
 

Bad_azz

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Harrumph. So basically she is saying, "no no, we can't get married in YOUR country, where it would be easy/cheaper, we have to get married in MY country. Now, YOU make it happen!"

Seems to me that if she wants to get married a certain way, she can assume a large share of the responsibility for sorting the bureaucracy (probably easier for her anyway, as a native Indonesian speaker).

- - -
On a more pleasant note, it's great of you to keep the forum updated on how everything goes. Much appreciated!
I believe if Aidan steps back a bit and says, nah- way too much hassle mate, let's forget the wedding.
He might just find his wife to be will do an about turn on a lot of things she is inisting on.
 

Mitian_Indau

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I think that both Puspawarna and Bad_azz raise valid points. It would be easier for your wife-to-be to tackle much of the bureaucratic side of things, particularly given that she's pushing for the Indonesian wedding. You've already converted, which is the biggest ticket item on the list for most Indonesian families. I'd also be asking what her family can do on the ground to smooth the process out. At the end of the day, they're the ones who benefit from all of this hoop jumping.

My brother-in-law (helped by parents-in-law) did all of the work for our Indonesian ceremony. My contribution was turn up, shut up, smile and entertain the village as a bule. We worked out the budget beforehand, so no surprises there. Legal wedding was in Australia (this was partially to help simplify the visa nightmare there).

It's also worth remembering that a wedding is one day (or 2-3 if it's in the village), but that a marriage is built over years. Don't sacrifice one for the other. Besides, once grandkids come along, that's more important to the grandparents (than a distant wedding several years ago).
 

Mitian_Indau

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I assume you've read about arrangements for a prenuptial agreement in Indonesia too? It's more to protect your wife's rights as a citizen (i.e. with property). This was one of those things we didn't know about beforehand (I found the forum too late for that one).

The other thing to consider is any potential divorce. From a personal standpoint, I'd prefer this to be handled under a western legal system (in my case Australia, New Zealand for yours). Each party has their rights and those are likely to be upheld. As regards Indonesia, the consensus I've been led to believe is that the deck is somewhat stacked against you before even setting foot inside a courtroom. That may reflect my own bias and I am aware of examples to the contrary (read about Atlantis' experience, though it wasn't divorce-related), but I know which I'd prefer in terms of transparency and a level playing field. It takes on added importance once kids become involved too.

Please don't be offended for me raising these points (i.e. prenup & divorce), I don't mean it as a reflection on your relationship, just as a means to avoid some huge pitfalls down the track, should these ever eventuate. We never buy insurance wanting our house to burn down!

I'm also curious, do you know what the fees for permanent residency are in New Zealand (i.e. spousal visa)? I only ask because I'm interested in how it compares with Australia, where we had to pay an exorbitant AUD 7,000 and wait 3 years from start to finish. I'd not wish that on anyone!

Best of luck for the upcoming nuptials too.
 

Aidan1988

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Just to follow up.
I had my nikah on 24 august.
Registering at KUA was pretty straight forward. Went in a few days before the nikah and showed them passport, birth certificate, certificate of no impediment with attached consular certificate and a certificate of my conversion to Islam.
The guy at KUA said he would get the documents translated himself. He also said something about needing to register at police but said he would arrange that himself. He also questioned why there was no proper visa in my passport, he then said i obviously didnt mention to the immigration officer at Soekarno Hatta i was there to marry, implying i should have applied for visa beforehand. Well, i just had the free visa stamp, i wasnt intending to stay in Indonesia long term and from what i understand the 30 day free visa is acceptable for marrying, so i dont really know what he was on about. Also the police thing was weird too, i thought that was only necessary for those living in Indonesia long term.
And he managed to extract 5 million rupiah as a fee, extra charge being for translation and police registering, and a bit of bule tax i suppose. :-D

Prenup was easy too, just got a random notary in Tangerang to draw one up, hand over 5 million rupiah, give it to KUA guy, stamp in buku nikah, done.
Just a pity my buku nikah has crease right down it from carrying it in hip bag with passport to Malaysia.

Tried to get a marriage certificate too from civil registry in Tangerang, but they said no, not for muslims, despite being told by a lawyer i could get one. Apparently some countries dont accept buku nikah as proof of marriage, they need authenticated marriage certificate. But for me, its not really an issue, my government says buku nikah is sufficient and i dont even need to register marriage in my country.
Just show copy of buku nikah to immigration when applying for visa to bring wife home.
And thats where the fun begins, my countries immigration department can be an absolute nightmare to deal with in regards to partnership visas. Pray for us. :-D
 

Aidan1988

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Me, being a wise ass, paid him in 50K notes counted out at his desk in front of the witnesses to the certificate signing. I also commented that it must be difficult for poor people to convert. He took his revenge later that day. He was also set to officiate the wedding ceremony later that week and called my wife to say that we had to pay another 2 million or he wouldn't show up. I'm assuming he had to split some of the original 5 million with his staff after they saw me pay him and wanted to make up for it.
Funny, i had to pay 5 million too. This seems to be going rate for foreigners. :-D Part of that was a 'translation fee', 'police registration fee' and 'not proper visa in passport fee'.
 

Aidan1988

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I assume you've read about arrangements for a prenuptial agreement in Indonesia too? It's more to protect your wife's rights as a citizen (i.e. with property). This was one of those things we didn't know about beforehand (I found the forum too late for that one).

The other thing to consider is any potential divorce. From a personal standpoint, I'd prefer this to be handled under a western legal system (in my case Australia, New Zealand for yours). Each party has their rights and those are likely to be upheld. As regards Indonesia, the consensus I've been led to believe is that the deck is somewhat stacked against you before even setting foot inside a courtroom. That may reflect my own bias and I am aware of examples to the contrary (read about Atlantis' experience, though it wasn't divorce-related), but I know which I'd prefer in terms of transparency and a level playing field. It takes on added importance once kids become involved too.

Please don't be offended for me raising these points (i.e. prenup & divorce), I don't mean it as a reflection on your relationship, just as a means to avoid some huge pitfalls down the track, should these ever eventuate. We never buy insurance wanting our house to burn down!

I'm also curious, do you know what the fees for permanent residency are in New Zealand (i.e. spousal visa)? I only ask because I'm interested in how it compares with Australia, where we had to pay an exorbitant AUD 7,000 and wait 3 years from start to finish. I'd not wish that on anyone!

Best of luck for the upcoming nuptials too.

First stage would be partnership work visa which is $635 NZD and second stage would be partnership residency visa which is $1480 NZD.

The Australian partnership visa fees are criminal extortion. They are charging as high as they possibly can due it being a captive market.
People have a basic human right to found and maintain a family unit with protection from the state, without government placing unreasonable financial hurdles in the way.
 

Jaime C

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5 jt for a prenup is a bit high. Always better to have a friend who is a local negotiate the fees.
 

Lemonyellow

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When I was preparing to come here to get married, I called my country's embassy in Jakarta several times about the 'certificate of no impediment' and as I was told I collected it from my district commissioner office and later I submitted it to the embassy in Jakarta and they gave me a translated one in return with a fee of 225.000rp ( probably around $15). That's it , and the Kua didn't ask for any other translated or sworn documents.
 

cestpasmyjob

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Congrats! For me I made the shahada in front of my FIL. No one questioned it as he built the mosque we married in... and I never got or needed a certificate - but I did get a gift of ,A child’s guide to Islam, from my witness. Circumcision was ruled out by my wife on the basis it would ruin the honeymoon

My witness later in life became a well known TV preacher... at the time he was a local iman who spoke good english.

My FIL was very much old school Javanese muslim- believed in reincarnation and a glass of red wine. MIL never wore hijab even after hajj.
 
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Helpful Herbert

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If a child did the aqiqah as a baby (and has the certificate) and is Islam on the KK, but in practice has never done or studied anything Islam-related because they follow the religion of the other parent, does that mean they are officially Islam or not?
 

snpark

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Banjarmasin 2009 wasn't charged anything, not even asked if I was udah sunat or not and I got a free koran, rug and sarong also
5* on trip advisor for that one
 

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