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ISO 3+ BR Home in Bandung 100jt or less

cup1981

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Jan 5, 2018
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Hey, We are moving to Indonesia on May 23 and will need a rental home starting in June. We are thinking about the "quieter" areas of Bandung. We are looking for at least a 3-bedroom place (preferably larger) with at least 125 square meters of space. We also would like a water heater, A/C in each bedroom and main living spaces, and preferably at least one western-style "dry" bathroom.

Our budget is Rp.100 jt or less. Let me know what you will have available around that time and if we can visit it when we land in late-May.
 

Jaime C

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Hey, We are moving to Indonesia on May 23 and will need a rental home starting in June. We are thinking about the "quieter" areas of Bandung. We are looking for at least a 3-bedroom place (preferably larger) with at least 125 square meters of space. We also would like a water heater, A/C in each bedroom and main living spaces, and preferably at least one western-style "dry" bathroom.

Our budget is Rp.100 jt or less. Let me know what you will have available around that time and if we can visit it when we land in late-May.
100jt a month? :)

We rented a house that lovely B_A helped us find in 2012. 2 bedrooms in the main house, plus an upstairs bedroom in the back. We initially paid $300 USD or so a month, on a yearly contract in IDR. The yearly increases kept going up, so it was $350 by the time we bought a house, and at one point they wanted us to sign a 3-4 year contract, paid up front!

We live a little in the hills, and don’t find a need for air conditioning. We have a ceiling fan, plus stand fans. In Jakarta, I’d certainly need it.

The house we bought and remodeled is about 200sm. Two bedrooms on each floor.

I would not rush into a long term lease without knowing the neighborhood and neighbors. My Indonesian wife is very social, and we had our baby the first year we moved in. We felt very welcomed, and get along with most of the residents in the neighborhood.

We had a neighborhood party for our daughter’s first birthday, and had over 100 people show up in the community park.

I really like Bandung, but of course the traffic can drive you crazy. I’d say live close to where you want to be.

Also, if things like a mosque are going to bother you, check all the sound levels before moving in. I consider our neighborhood fairly quiet, but you have all the pushcarts and motorbike riding vendors in the morning, multiple mosques call to prayer, and kids playing in the street.
 

Bad_azz

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@ OP.
I guess it depends where you want to locate to- Bandung is a pretty huge place really. You can certainly get what you are stipulating and more. Will there be work involved? Kids? Schools? Just retirement? These will likely factor in suitable areas.
re the A/C again as JaimeC said- not really needed up in the hills. I certainly don't have it in my house and have never felt the need for it- on the hottest days here a fan is quite enough.
PM me if you wish some assistance/discussion about suitable areas, properties & I will do what I can to help out.
 

jstar

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Jul 31, 2016
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I advise staying to the north of the city as the water is better(allegedly)
No, that's an urban myth and based on a misunderstanding. Long ago with the Dutch using the water from the Cikapundung and Cibeureum rivers in the north, the quality was quite good.

Now esp. in dry season, the water is very polluted and they can only use a rather low % of the rivers which can obviously increase during the rainy season.

But the crux of the matter is that the water treatment takes place in the north, and the inhabitants of other areas complain their water supply is often interrupted. (Pipes are old and break, there is not enough water, etc.) Unlike those 'living up north'. And the water they pump up in private wells is rather bad.
 

Bad_azz

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I guess it depend where up north is, my private well has mountain spring water in it and the vast majority of people in our village use it [edit- spring water, not our well] for drinking.
I wasn't thinking of piped paid for water. Your explanation is interesting tho :) tks x

@ Mods/Admin... errors occured when responding to this post... if it happens again will grab the number for you.
 

Bad_azz

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Hahaha & the error did not occur again! Sod's Law :D
 

DzulnSiti

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Aug 25, 2016
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74
@ OP.
I certainly don't have it in my house and have never felt the need for it- on the hottest days here a fan is quite enough.
PM me if you wish some assistance/discussion about suitable areas, properties & I will do what I can to help out.
Once I got to be WNI hopefully by July-Aug I intend to settle permanently in Bandung. What would you suggest I stay that have good source of water? I have a budget of Rp1M which mean I do not have spare change to do a renovation. Thanks.
 

Jaime C

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Once I got to be WNI hopefully by July-Aug I intend to settle permanently in Bandung. What would you suggest I stay that have good source of water? I have a budget of Rp1M which mean I do not have spare change to do a renovation. Thanks.
Most properties have wells. Just make sure it’s deep enough, so it doesn’t run out of water in the dry season.

If you mean 1 billion rupiah (about $70k US), there can be options if you’re willing to move further out, or buy a small parcel of land and build something. We were investigating this at first.

Our previous RT, went this route after we bought his 9 year old house that was owned by his whole family. He had to split the money with a lot of siblings, so didn’t have a big budget.

He bought a couple of hundred meters of land, spent another 200-250 jt on a block house. Probably 350 juta total cost including land, but he worked all the angles. Knew people, had basic construction done. Nothing too fancy.

I’d really suggest going slow and not rush anything. Rent for at least a year. We ended up renting for 4 years or so before finally finding something reasonable. And then spent 6 months doing a top to bottom remodel before we moved in.
 

jstar

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Talking about that budget and not having spare change for a renovation:

Honestly I have not seen a house here that did not need a renovation. Or at least some major repairs. Hopefully some of those can wait a couple of years so you can tackle them over a longer period.

Do not kid yourself by assuming a house looks good and thus can be ready to move in. (Yes that's subjective.) There are always surprises, water leaks you won't notice since you moved in during dry season, devices as water pomps and aircon units that suddenly conk out, unsafe electrical installations, not even mentioning the rayap that will have infested your house if the roof structure is still wood.

There's no buyer's warranty, no consumer protection, no technical building inspections, ....
 

DzulnSiti

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Aug 25, 2016
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I have done a search and noted in words and when the time right I will follow the list and tour the house as detail as it can be. Like what Jstar have said there sure be Jack in the Box.
 

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