Indonesia plans restrictive law on music.

Discussion in 'In the News' started by dafluff, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. dafluff

    dafluff
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    Since the Indonesian parliament (DPR) is by far the most trusted body in Indonesia (actually no, it's dead last), and it has been extremely efficient at law making (actually, it's never been this bad, passing only 6 out of a planned 52 laws in all of 2017), it is of course drafting an extremely important law, namely one governing music.

    As expected, some of the articles in the law is drawing loud protests from the musical community. In particular 6 articles have been identified that dangerously limit expression, artistic independence, and are otherwise plain ridiculous.

    For example, article 5 prohibits musicians from creating content that is deemed pornographic, provoke conflict between groups, blasphemous, carrying negative foreign influence, and lowering human dignity.

    b9997db5-f410-4247-904e-061c850f1f1d.jpg
    Infographic: Problematic articles within the planned law. Source: CNN Indonesia

    This article is so broad, that musicians rightfully fear for their freedom of expression. It is also xenophobic to the point of silliness. Surya Fikri Asshidiq of The Panturas feels that this law will create problems rather than providing solutions. "These articles interfere with musician's creativity, something that should be free". A growing number of musicians are also protesting the law.

    That is not the only article that stands out as problematic. Article 18 requires all musical performances to involve licensed promoters. Article 19 requires foreign musicians/musical performance to include local musicians as accompaniment.

    Article 32 requires musicians to take competency exams.

    Article 42 requires hotels, restaurants and other entertainment venues to play traditional music.

    Article 50 prescribes jail sentences for article 5 violators.

    Indonesia is clearly going down a path of restricting freedoms. It is also remains stubbornly xenophobic. Both are prescriptions for continuing poverty and stifled growth. I truly have misgivings about Indonesia's future. Regardless who wins the election this year, it is all but certain that Indonesia is going to regress and may loss decades of progress.

    https://nasional.tempo.co/read/1171129/musisi-ruu-permusikan-membawa-kembali-ke-jaman-orde-lama
     
  2. Vanhelsing

    Vanhelsing Well-Known Member Cager

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    Pol Pot was rather splendid at stifling expression from the artistic and educated.
     
  3. Daniel50

    Daniel50 Well-Known Member

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    Now if they could just list corruption, and prioritize it, in the list of slippery slope moral grievances against religion, broader society and the younger generation:tape:, then maybe some real progress could be made. But the best way to ignore the elephant, or in this case elephants, is to focus on other stuff.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2019
  4. nd_eric_77

    nd_eric_77 Member Charter Member Cager

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    This reads like it is destined to become one of the 46/52 proposed laws that ultimately do not get enacted.
     
  5. dafluff

    dafluff
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    Probably. Even so, the increasing drive towards more restrictive speech, and the increasing anti foreign sentiment is a continuing trend.
     
  6. Banana72

    Banana72 Member Charter Member Cager

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    Musicians?? Sounds like this applies to nasi bungkus groups instead!!
     
  7. Jamu

    Jamu Member Charter Member Cager

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    Reminds me of the many past proposed laws to ban alcohol in the country, which all died quiet deaths after much initial publicity. There is too much money to be made to agree idiotic laws affecting tourism that would threaten to kill the golden goose that enriches and feeds so many people. Won't happen.
     
  8. Bad_azz

    Bad_azz Well-Known Member Charter Member Cager

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  9. harryopal

    harryopal Active Member Charter Member

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    Across many years I don't recall any overt hostility in Indonesia. To the contrary, in my experiences I have found Indonesians polite and friendly. I suspect foreigners in Australia would experience much more indifference and occasional hostility.

    But there are certainly forces in this country that seem eager to impose restrictions on freedom. The suggestion that military officers may again be appointed in positions of power outside the military is also a matter for serious concern.
     
  10. atlantis

    atlantis
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    I beg to differ in the interpretation of what happens/happened for alcohol regs.

    Those who promote these regulations know/knew well that there is no chance that said article drafted get to the last draft.

    However what they want, and what they have achieved incredibly well so far is to put enough pressure so that lower, more discreet regulations get passed.

    This is what has happened in the past 5 years: establishing quotas per region, making it harder to get a license to sell/distribute, raising taxes...etc. This has an effect on distributors and prices have drastically increased in the past few years.

    Would you believe that, at the moment, in a city of about 500K inhabitants like where I live, you wouldn't find a single bottle of wine in a front shop? And it is in a predominantly a Christian region. Reason is simple: red tape to legally sell alcohol are now so high that profits can t cover it. Now, the distribution of alcohol in my region is done "confidentially" by a handful (well, half of an handful) of players. I could tell you much more about it, but we would have to use The Cage for it.
     
  11. dafluff

    dafluff
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    Fair enough. It's a bit of a disconnect however. The average Indonesian is of course friendly towards a visitor. But try to get their views on foreigners working in Indonesia, or owning land or investing, etc.

    The laws of the land in part reflects what the population wants. This is why it is so hard to for foreigners, even long time residents with KITAPs (people even the law submits are residents/penduduk) are restricted from working, owning land, investing, and so on.

    This is also why even tiny steps recently implemented by the president to ease the requirements of a work permit, are quickly negated by others in the government (see the IMTA becoming "notifikasi", for example).

    See also the whole Freeport situation: Indonesian's are generally divided into two groups on this. One that is proud that the gov't was able to buy back majority control (dubious business decision, mostly done on national pride, rather than sound financials), and the other group who thought the gov't should've just taken it back by force...
     
  12. Bad_azz

    Bad_azz Well-Known Member Charter Member Cager

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    I think it also depends on what sector of foreigner these things refer to too... some are more welcome than others (as is the global trend)
     
  13. dafluff

    dafluff
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  14. jstar

    jstar Mr. 10,000

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    Many extreme proposals are not implemented as laws of course. But if you look at the last decade, many rules and local laws are put in place and they make life less agreeable.

    I remember the (pressure on the) infamous Lady Gaga concerts. As well as (unpunished) raids during Ramadan, etc. The thing is, that unlike many other countries in the region, there is a tendency to tell people from other faiths and denominations what (NOT) to do. Whether it's in music, movies, alcohol, mixed marriage, public conversations, celebrate Valentine day, or whatever.

    In Malaysia for instance, nobody could care less what I do in my personal life, since it is determined I have a different religion and thus I will be left alone. Over here there is a fanatic minority which wants to prescribe how others should live. And the majority -as so often- is afraid and silent.

    I'm not sure if it is fear of having the own people pulled to the 'dark side' or just a 'we know what's best for them' mentality.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
  15. jstar

    jstar Mr. 10,000

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    Yesterday was the last plenary meeting (out of three) before the recess which takes place February 14 - March 3. Now, of the 560 DPR members only 223 members were present. They were supposed to discuss and possibly (dis)approve 26 bills, of which only 3 are covered and approved. The remainders are thrown on the big pile.
    .
     
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