Getting your money out of an Indonesian bank for a disabled relative

Jaime C

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My FIL had a brain aneurysm almost three years ago. We have been taking care of him medically, and with a 24/7 nurse since he was released from the hospital.

As you can imagine, it’s been a traumatic event for the entire family. Sometimes it’s little things that aggravate you the most.

My FIL had a bank account with a large, but not huge, bank in Indonesia. Not BCA or similar. We used to transfer money into the account every month, and he would use it as needed. After his hospital stay and brain surgery, he was confined to his bed or wheelchair, and could no longer write, or barely speak.

Since we are only in Indonesia for a couple months this summer, my wife has been doing some financial housekeeping. My FIL had a moderate amount of 4 juta in his account, but we don’t know his pin number or anything to remove funds. Given the amount of ATM accounts that were hacked, we thought it just better to get the money out.

My wife went to the bank, and was given a simple form to fill out. She filled it out, and brought his ID, and other details to the bank. This visit, there was a new manager who insisted that we had to go to pay a notary, and have a lot more paperwork done. Since we have a limited amount of time here before we return, and a notary is usually a bit expensive, Ibu was not pleased in the least.

I told her to bring my FIL to the bank, along with my MIL. And sit in the bank asking for his money back. It’s not too easy to load my FIL in the car, but we turned it into an outing. Indonesia isn’t the most wheelchair friendly country.

So they went to the bank, and my wife mentioned that if the problem wasn’t solved, all of our deposits would be leaving the bank this week. Suddenly, it became an easy matter. He didn’t even have to come into the bank, they just came out and took a picture.

I guess this bank having been sold to a Japanese bank recently, and not wanting to lose our deposits may have had something to do with it. It’s sad that they made it so hard. My wife has been stressing out about it for the last month. What would a normal couple do in such a situation, other than spend money they couldn't afford on a notary?

Needless to say, having another person as a signatory on the account would have been good.
 

jstar

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It sucks Jaime. Their ultra stringent procedures and almost absent customer service, have a devastating impact on family members who want to do the right thing.

Same with my brother who -as you might know- passed away over a year ago. So more than 15 months later I still couldn't close bank accounts, stop credit cards, etc. because the Probate Office in Liverpool has a tremendous backlog and did not provide the evidence yet.

And the banks and financial institutions alll express their empathy but -according to their own words- can't do anything. Their hands are tied by their own procedures and legal implications.
 

centurion

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Ultra stringent procedures exist so relatives cannot plunder sick or old people`s accounts.
In other more serious countries, the bank would as for a court order or another proof that you are a guardian.
 

Jaime C

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Ultra stringent procedures exist so relatives cannot plunder sick or old people`s accounts.
In other more serious countries, the bank would as for a court order or another proof that you are a guardian.
I understand the need to safeguard the accounts. The problem occurs when they state they need their form filled out, documentation from the doctor and such, and then when you comply, change the requirements.

There should also be different requirements depending on the amount. To require someone to spend 1-2 juta on a notary to get just over 4 juta is ridiculous.

It’s not a huge amount. We spend this amount every 2 weeks or so caring for him and Oma, and the level of nonsense involved seemed extreme.
 

centurion

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If the sick person is still conscious, notarized PoA would be a minimum, as a notary has an obligation to check is the person mentally capable or not for signing.
 

vocalneal

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I think the bank would have had power of attorney forms which you could have had him scratch a signature.
 

centurion

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I think the bank would have had power of attorney forms which you could have had him scratch a signature.
True, but these PoAs are signed in front of the bank officials usually. If a person cannot come because he/she is incapacitated, either bank official has to come to his home or you should provide notarized PoA.
 

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