BPJS Keshatan Premium Increase

dafluff

Moderator
Moderator
Cager
Joined
Jul 13, 2016
Messages
3,065
After battling deficits for the past few years, the government has steeply increased the premiums for the national health insurance, BPJS.

As per the newest regulation Presidential Decree No 75 / 2019, the premiums for independent participants are Rp 160,000 (100% increase), Rp 110,000 (100% increase) and Rp 42,000 (64% increase) for Class I, II and III respectively.

For employees, the premium remains at 5% of monthly salary, but the salary cap has been increased from Rp 8 million to Rp 12 million, potentially increasing the nominal premium by up to 50%.

We have updated our article on BPJS Kesehatan accordingly.


 

jstar

Mr. 10,000
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
Messages
3,681
You could ask yourself how the people who need it most, will be affected by this. I'm aware of quite some persons not having BPJS just because of the monthly fees which were deemed too high.
 

Nimbus

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 17, 2016
Messages
1,064
You could ask yourself how the people who need it most, will be affected by this. I'm aware of quite some persons not having BPJS just because of the monthly fees which were deemed too high.
It is a tough question indeed. The gov’t has no financial ability to simply make it free for the 3rd class patients, but the fee hike does push them out of the system.

Oh well, at least (fairly) inexpensive insurance is available for most people.
 

Wisnu

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
Messages
351
Ironically, many people who need it most, prefer to spend their money for cigarettes, probably more than the Bpjs premium.
 

Nimbus

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 17, 2016
Messages
1,064
Ironically, many people who need it most, prefer to spend their money for cigarettes, probably more than the Bpjs premium.
Yeah, Rp 42K is less than two packs of cigarettes.
 

scouser59

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 17, 2016
Messages
470
I wonder how much of the cost overuns are caused by various "unscrupilous practices" within the system ,its hardly unknown here to be "fast and loose" when it comes to "gelt" , Unfortunately .
 

Jamu

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 24, 2016
Messages
349
The increase in premiums is not surprising given that overall healthcare costs are also increasing. Many healthcare supplies are still imported, eg non-generic drugs, medical equipment, devices, etc etc and they have been getting more expensive globally, not even taking into account the weak rupiah. Salaries, starting with the periodic minimum wage increases which create a bottom up pressure, are also increasing. Plus, as BPJS gets more popular and widespread it's usage is growing, putting more burden on the system and driving up costs. If the trends continue I would expect to see more premium increases in the not too distant future.
 

Helpful Herbert

Active Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Messages
142
it is extremely underpriced if you compare to what people pay for the NHS in general taxation, and also considering the potential demand for services since people take so little care of their health here. Imagine if every Indonesian who avoids doctors or prefers to go for a massage actually went to hospitals instead. Even a 5x hike wouldn't cover it.
 

jstar

Mr. 10,000
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
Messages
3,681
Many healthcare supplies are still imported, eg non-generic drugs,
Most of the raw materials for the medicines here are imported, almost 94%.

it is extremely underpriced if you compare to what people pay for the NHS in general taxation
You can conclude from an economic standpoint it is underpriced if the BPJS starts at 1% of the minimum wage in Jakarta and NHS takes more than 7% of the minimum wage in the UK.

There is a certain danger in just comparing numbers and figures with other countries though. Hospitals operate differently, people get different care, medication here is cheaper, salaries of healthcare professionals are lower, etc. etc.
 

scouser59

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 17, 2016
Messages
470
The problem here , ya bpjs is relatively cheap ,but the quality of care, hmmm !
ya we are in a developing country and I am sure there are some very good medical professionals.
But who knows if they are available for treatment in the "golden hour "
I have heard of nightmares experienced by my extended family, and this is in private institutions ,not bpjs . Inappropriate procedures for financial gain supported by untruths by so called specialists ,do they swear the "hippocratic oath" here ,I wonder .
Imho its a lottery whichever direction you choose .
 

Jamu

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 24, 2016
Messages
349
The problem here , ya bpjs is relatively cheap ,but the quality of care, hmmm !
ya we are in a developing country and I am sure there are some very good medical professionals.
But who knows if they are available for treatment in the "golden hour "
I have heard of nightmares experienced by my extended family, and this is in private institutions ,not bpjs . Inappropriate procedures for financial gain supported by untruths by so called specialists ,do they swear the "hippocratic oath" here ,I wonder .
Imho its a lottery whichever direction you choose .
Fair points, but the fact is that healthcare in Indonesia has improved significantly in a relatively short amount of time, albeit starting from a low base. Lots of room for further improvements, but despite the many challenges the overall trajectory is positive.
 

scouser59

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 17, 2016
Messages
470
Ya the graph is positive for the poor of indonesia for sure and I support the efforts of the government , Imho doctors should consider the patient first and their pocket second .
 

dafluff

Moderator
Moderator
Cager
Joined
Jul 13, 2016
Messages
3,065
It is a tough question indeed. The gov’t has no financial ability to simply make it free for the 3rd class patients, but the fee hike does push them out of the system.

Oh well, at least (fairly) inexpensive insurance is available for most people.
Actually the gov't subsidizes a very large number of BPJS participants. Out of about 223 million BPJS participants, 96 million are paid by the government (Penerima Bantuan Iuran). That is outside the TNI/Polri/Civil Service who number 17.5 million, and for which the government pays 60% of the premium (3% of salary, while the employee pays 2% of salary).

It is basically universal health care at this point, gaps in service not withstanding.

 

Nimbus

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 17, 2016
Messages
1,064
Actually the gov't subsidizes a very large number of BPJS participants. Out of about 223 million BPJS participants, 96 million are paid by the government (Penerima Bantuan Iuran). That is outside the TNI/Polri/Civil Service who number 17.5 million, and for which the government pays 60% of the premium (3% of salary, while the employee pays 2% of salary).

It is basically universal health care at this point, gaps in service not withstanding.

That is a humongous burden for the state. Can they keep it up? I’m not so sure.
 

jstar

Mr. 10,000
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
Messages
3,681
Depending where one 'draws' the poverty line (at $0.87 or $2 consumption), many even still fall between the cracks.
 

Dave70

Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2018
Messages
107
Actually Indonesia is a rich country, if only the money is managed well, there can be free heathcare for all. Take Hong Kong for example, any citizen by just showing their ID card can get free consultation or treatment which include medicine and hospitalization. The problem with Indonesia is the leakage or “bocor bocor” as purported by Prabowo. In addition, the country can save tons of money by 1. Reducing the number of civil servants. 2. Eliminating temporary “honorer” workers. 3. Shrinking the size of DPR and DPRD. 4. Forgo lavish spending like recently some new members of parliament received Toyota Crown which is much more expensive than a Toyota Camry. Just something off the top of my head, I’m sure there are many.
 

jstar

Mr. 10,000
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
Messages
3,681
The problem with Indonesia is the leakage or “bocor bocor” as purported by Prabowo
Yes it's really ridiculous. It's also because too much has been decentralized.

See what one regent who recently got caught, 'collected' in vehicles:



But if you noticed the increase of the new DPR and DPRD and the members of Jokowi's team, you realize not a lot will change.
 

Euc-

Well-Known Member
Charter Member
Cager
Joined
Jul 21, 2016
Messages
562
It's the new Ministers that are receiving the Toyota Crown Hybrids, to replace their old Toyota Crown Royal Saloon's now 10+ years old. They aren't THAT much more expensive than the Camry's (count cost-price not selling price in Indonesia, the government won't pay tax for those operational cars).

Eliminating Honorer workers? As far as I'm aware the majority of teachers in public schools are "honorary workers", same as my wife's sister. She gets a salary of abt 500rb paid every quarter, for doing a full-time job. Please explain what the government can save by eliminating them?

Reducing civil servants? With so little already being done, can you imagine if half of them get cut? That won't work unless very serious changes in attitude and work methods happen, neither realistic.

I'm not saying the government couldn't save money, but a one time in 10-years car purchase for some ministers isn't going to get you that many long-term savings.
 

jstar

Mr. 10,000
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
Messages
3,681
Well, we go rather off-topic now, but just to make a global point using that car example:

So they buy 101 Crown hybrids. Supposedly they cost 778 Juta per car.

They buy a car which is not sold here, from Japan via the largest importer and car company in the country (Astra). That way nobody really knows the price paid and the conditions. I have never read anything about a public tender. (Which should happen for transparency, see for instance the purchase of police cars in European countries.)

And these things happen constantly (infrastructure, KTP, etc. etc.) and it shows everywhere it sticks to the fingers... so the money doesn't get where it should.
 

jstar

Mr. 10,000
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
Messages
3,681
Ah, here in this kota of Jakarta -starting tomorrow morning- they will sweep the city and inquire at every house how many people live there (check KK) and request proof of the BPJS membership.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Follow Us

Latest Expat Indo Articles

Latest Activity

New posts Latest threads

Latest Tweets by Expat Indo

Online Now

Forum Statistics

Threads
4,028
Messages
61,674
Members
1,546
Latest member
Methblinkz
Top Bottom