A new era of world wide poverty

France is struggling with unmanageable migration, 14 june 2023.

Around the corner of the Arc de Triomphe in the heart of Paris you see the same image every evening: at the beginning of the evening, families settle there, on an empty floor of a parking garage. They are 'sans papers', people without a residence permit.

Tents
They are taken care of by aid organization Utopia 56. Rabia Yolal is a psychologist and has a second job at night as an aid worker. "These families live on the street. We shelter them in tents. It's not ideal, but it's a safer place for families and single women," says Yolal.

France had 156,000 new asylum seekers last year. There will probably be more this year. A large majority of the French believe that there are far too many immigrants in France. Support for far-right parties has been growing for years. Marine Le Pen's radical right-wing opposition party, Rassemblement National, has become the largest opposition party in parliament since last year's elections. The party accuses the Macron government of a 'bankrupt migration policy'.

 
Asia largest plastic polluters for oceans


Indonesia, with approximately 275 million inhabitants, is one of the largest waste producers in the world, of which only a part is collected. The rest partly ends up in rivers that flow into the sea. There, plastic bags cling to coral reefs or reinforce the plastic island that is steadily forming on the Pacific Ocean. According to the World Bank, Indonesia produces 7.8 million tons of plastic waste per year, of which 4.9 million tons is not properly processed (open landfill, burning in a garden, discarding on the roadside or in the river). The Dutch NGO The Ocean Cleanup ranks Indonesia as the fifth largest ocean polluter (after the Philippines, India, Malaysia and China). So those who want to clean up the oceans would do well to reduce the use of plastic in Asia and improve waste management.

A recycling pilot in Ambon by Dutch TNO
"Ambon is an interesting test location," says Lisanne Heemskerk of the Dutch research institute TNO. At the expense of the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (stimulating sustainable entrepreneurship) and P4G, it is building a calculation model to measure the effects of the pilot. ‘In Ambon, they also extract low-quality plastic from mixed waste. Most countries can't do anything with that, but it can still result in pallets or planks made of plastic. That is better than incineration.’ In the coming years, Heemskerk will calculate the particulate matter and nitrogen content in the Ambonese air, as well as the amount of harmful particles in the soil (ecotoxicity) and the amount of waste on landfill. She estimates that 70 percent of Ambonese waste is collected. “The rest are burned by civilians in their gardens or leak into nature. We will also investigate the effects of this.'

 

Attachments

  • Azie_plastic_2023.jpg
    Azie_plastic_2023.jpg
    94.7 KB · Views: 38
Last edited:
The damage of fast fashion: 'Do you also come to clean up in Ghana?'

In Ghana, where second-hand clothing ends up en masse, they notice how big the problem is that discarded clothing causes. Exports of discarded clothing from the European Union to Africa and Asia in particular tripled between the years 2000 and 2019, says the European Environment Agency.
The Ghanaian capital Accra is experiencing the consequences: 40 percent of the clothing that arrives here becomes waste, says the OR Foundation, an organization in Accra that stimulates reuse and wants to reduce the environmental damage of fashion. Most of the discarded clothing goes to official landfills, but a lot is also burned on the edges of the market. In addition, there are illegal dump sites, because the sellers on the market have to quickly make room for the next full containers. A lot of clothing ends up on the beach via a dump along a river and open sewers that lead to the sea.

Check out the video (it's in English, maybe use VPN with location Holland):

 
Last edited:
This is morphing into a thread about world wide problems rather than poverty. Not that they are unrelated but admin might create a different thread. However, on the topic of plastic waste there is currently advertising on TV here with a promotion for recycling that is said to turn plastic waste into things like joggers and such. Unfortunately there has been a universal trend for authorities to want to be seen to be doing something and recycling programs are established only later for it to be exposed that the separated items such as glass, metals and plastics are ultimately dumped together.

I think it might be Germany where finally governments are imposing taxes on the petroleum and plastic producing corporations which produce this rubbish. We have a long way to go to get on top of these problems. Meanwhile vast areas of land and sea accumulate more and more waste.
 
Jakarta lies on soft layers of sand and clay. If you pump out more groundwater than naturally flows in, the water pressure will decrease and the clay layers in particular will collapse. Large parts of Jakarta have thus fallen below sea level.
The city is a bathtub. Rivers run through it, but they can no longer discharge their own water into the sea because the sea level is too high. So the water has to be pumped out. Not the sea, but the city is now the drain, which entails enormous pollution.
In 2019, the Indonesian government decided to build a new capital on the island of Kalimantan. Life in Jakarta had become too unsafe because of the rising water. So, this decision is a BIG sign for people to move out of Jakarta. But, as you know ... people are ... like ostriches, sticking their heads in the sand. Don't want to deal with the emerging danger.
The plan of the government is to move out 17.000 civil servants from Jakarta to the new capital city IKN ... already next year.

 
Last edited:
To live and stay where?
In the new capital city IKN .. in progress. Check out the videos e.g. on Twitter. Youtube and Facebook groups IKN ...

 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20230705_095053_Volkskrant.jpg
    Screenshot_20230705_095053_Volkskrant.jpg
    53.1 KB · Views: 65
  • Screenshot_20230705_094806_Facebook.jpg
    Screenshot_20230705_094806_Facebook.jpg
    29.5 KB · Views: 37
Last edited:
In the new capital city IKN .. in progress. Check out the videos e.g. on Twitter. Youtube and Facebook groups IKN ...

Plan is to open "ibu kota nusantara" next year august.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20230709_000003_Chrome.jpg
    Screenshot_20230709_000003_Chrome.jpg
    59.3 KB · Views: 35
  • Screenshot_20230709_000041_Chrome.jpg
    Screenshot_20230709_000041_Chrome.jpg
    64.7 KB · Views: 40
Like in myanmar they forced civil servants to move to nyipiydaw before there were any schools hospitals or anything to do. Result was a lot of very unhappy civil servants separated from their families.
 
Like in myanmar they forced civil servants to move to nyipiydaw before there were any schools hospitals or anything to do. Result was a lot of very unhappy civil servants separated from their families.
It will be interesting to see what the effect will be of moving 17.000 people out off Jakarta. Will it be less 'macet' and significantly? What will be the effect on the housing market? Other effects?
 
Last edited:
It will be interesting to see what the effect will be of moving 17.000 people out off Jakarta. Will it be less 'macet' and significantly? What will be the effect on the housing market? Other effects?
Why would there be any effect on the housing market? Firstly 17,000 is nothing in Jakarta, secondly they are not going to be selling their houses. Their families still have to live somewhere. No doubt they will be provided free accommodation in the new capital as well for the duration of their employment, but when they leave their job they need somewhere to live, I don't think anyone will stay in the jungle voluntarily.
 
Why would there be any effect on the housing market? Firstly 17,000 is nothing in Jakarta, secondly they are not going to be selling their houses. Their families still have to live somewhere. No doubt they will be provided free accommodation in the new capital as well for the duration of their employment, but when they leave their job they need somewhere to live, I don't think anyone will stay in the jungle voluntarily.
Only the first shift of moving out people .. The rest will follow soon.
 
A major consideration will be the need to have a really world class, high speed internet capability. As services are shifted with some in Jakarta and some in Kalimantan the need for immediate and effective communication will be critical to avoid chaos, not to mention the importance for families split apart.

This is all a brave and necessary development but given the tendency for blow outs, unexpected problems and the capacity for people to cock things up it will need a succession of miracles to have this fall into place as currently planned.
 
And it is far more difficult and challenging than it was in Myanmar, because in Myanmar you can drive on a straight road for 4 hours between Yangon and Naypyidaw, so people could share a car and go back to their families fairly often. 18 years on, traffic in Yangon has worsened, house prices doubled and no-one really wants to move to Naypyidaw.

Here the only option is by plane. Imagine half a million civil servants wanting to fly back to Jakarta every month.
 
And it is far more difficult and challenging than it was in Myanmar, because in Myanmar you can drive on a straight road for 4 hours between Yangon and Naypyidaw, so people could share a car and go back to their families fairly often. 18 years on, traffic in Yangon has worsened, house prices doubled and no-one really wants to move to Naypyidaw.

Here the only option is by plane. Imagine half a million civil servants wanting to fly back to Jakarta every month.
Million servants is 5.000 airplanes departing every Friday and coming back on Sunday.
 
Maybe a vacuum tube with capsules as department stores used to have many years ago for sending dockets and money to the central office which returned change and a receipt to the customer. Very speedy. There might be a few technical difficulties scaling it up for humans and across the sea... but anyway.
 

Users who viewed this discussion (Total:0)

Follow Us

Latest Expat Indo Articles

Latest Tweets by Expat Indo

Latest Activity

New posts Latest threads

Online Now

Newest Members

Forum Statistics

Threads
6,062
Messages
100,221
Members
3,128
Latest member
ramsau
Back
Top Bottom